Presenters

Ellen Hillbom

Lund University, Sweden

Dorothee Hillrichs

IRES, Université Catholique de Louvain

William Horobin

Zainab Iftikhar

Goethe University Frankfurt

Holger Jara Tamayo

University of Essex

H. Xavier Jara works as a Research Fellow at the Institute for Social and Economic Research at the University of Essex. He works in the fields of public and development economics and specializes in the study of poverty and inequality, the redistributive effect of tax-benefit policies, labour supply and well-being measurement. His recent work concentrates on the link between informality and inequality in Latin America with a focus on the role of public policies.

Guillermina Jasso

New York University

Guillermina Jasso (PhD, Johns Hopkins) is Silver Professor of Arts and Science and Professor of Sociology at New York University.

https://as.nyu.edu/content/nyu-as/as/faculty/guillermina-jasso.html

https://www.iza.org/person/1583/guillermina-jasso

Anders Jensen

Harvard University

I am an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at Harvard University and Research Director of the State Program at the International Growth Centre (IGC).

My primary research interests are in Public Finance and Development.

Miriam Kohl

University of Mainz

I am a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Mainz and received a doctorate from the University of Dresden in 2019.

My research focuses on the interaction of globalization and public policy. I am working on the effects of globalization in the presence of a welfare state redistributing income, the effects of unilateral tax policy in the open economy and the distributional effects of trade policy.

Humberto Laudares

Ségal Le Guern Herry

Sciences Po

Ségal Le Guern Herry is a PhD candidate at Sciences Po, under the supervision of Gabriel Zucman and jean Marc Robin. His thesis, “Essays on Behavioral Responses to Taxation” investigates issues related to public economics, economics of taxation and applied microeconomics. He is particularly interested in tax evasion and its implications for tax progressivity and inequality.